CATEGORIES

Fozzy Whittaker channels Captain America

Here’s a cool story about Cleveland Browns running back Fozzy Whittaker who is definitely a serious Captain America fanboy.

University of Texas football coach Mack Brown chuckles at the memory of his starting tailback Fozzy Whittaker ambling across campus with a Captain America backpack strapped across his shoulders.

“He didn’t care whether people made fun of him,” Brown said. “Fozzy is who he is and he’s very proud of it.”

The Browns running back-kick returner owns Captain America figurines, Captain America T-shirts, Captain America gloves and socks, Captain America boxers and briefs, Captain America costume and shield.

The rest of the article goes on to explain how Fozzy became a huge comic book character fan through his mother. It’s an inspirational story. The video above was filmed when Fozzy was still playing for the San Diego Chargers and goes into his collection of Captain America memorabilia and other items.

Classic Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman sporting a swimsuit

Here’s a totally cheesy but still very sexy montage of Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman, with a scene of her in a swimsuit on the beach. Lynda Carter had an amazing figure and she’ll always be the standard for judging actresses to take on the Wonder Woman role. Enjoy!

Also, you can get a poster of Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman on AllPosters.com!

7HEQG00Z Lynda Carter Wonder Woman

“Game of Thrones” at Comic-Con

John Bradley, who plays Samwell Tarly in HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” talks about what Season 4.

Olivia Munn as Princess Leia

Olivia Munn posted this cool cosplay photo where she’s dressed up as Princess Leia. Too bad she didn’t do the bikini scene!

Good reviews for “Man of Steel”

Man of Steel

Bullz-Eye.com’s Jason Zingale likes this Superman reboot:

The best thing about “Man of Steel,” however, is the action. The fight scenes are lightning fast and brutal, really playing up the superhuman angle of the Kryptonians in a way that’s never been done before. Though there are only a handful of action sequences in the movie, all but one of them is outstanding, especially the fight between Superman and two of Zod’s soldiers in the streets of Smallville, which, despite some disgustingly blatant product placement, delivers everything that you’d expect from a modern day Superman film. The big finale is a little too generic and blockbustery for its own good, but by that point, “Man of Steel” had already won me over. It’s not quite as groundbreaking as what Nolan achieved with “Batman Begins,” but considering Warner’s recent track record with DC Comics characters, it’s a massive and incredibly enjoyable step in the right direction.

Not all critics love it but you can review all of them on Rotten Tomatoes.

“Iron Man 3″ hits theaters

“Iron Man 3″ is finally out, and you can Check out David Medsker’s review:

When it was announced that Jon Favreau would not return as director of the third “Iron Man” film, the producers surely fielded offers from every name director in town. So how did Shane Black land this gig, again? The guy hasn’t written or directed a feature film since 2005′s “Kiss Kiss Bang Bang,” and yet here he is, doing that Shane Black thing once again, only this time with superheroes, while trying his best to streamline his R-rated ways for a PG-13 audience. As it turns out, “Iron Man 3″ works, but just barely, and it’s more in spite of Black’s influence than because of it. At the beginning of the second act, Black begins to get in his own way, and for anyone familiar with his work, it’s not long before a strong case of deja vu sets in. He even set the movie during the holiday season, just like “Lethal Weapon.” And “The Long Kiss Goodnight.”

Check out more reviews at Rotten Tomatoes.

Superman’s roots in Cleveland

Cleveland.com is running a series of features to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the creation of Superman. Here’s a video about Superman’s Cleveland roots, and the prelude to a series of legal battles between the Cleveland creators and DC Comics.

“The Art of War” Merges History with Science Fiction

Image Courtesy of Kelly Roman

Roman’s “The Art of War” is set in a near future where the Chinese dominate the American economy, as well as that of most of the rest of the world. This title is built on political and economic intrigue. However, even if you are not the economic/political intrigue type, there should be plenty of action and gore to keep you interested. The title is illustrated by Michael DeWeese in black and white with red highlights, to give the classic violent black and white comic look to great effect. True to its namesake, this graphic novel is laced with Sun Tzu’s sayings throughout (For those of you who skipped that day in school, Sun Tzu was a warlord in medieval China. He was widely regarded as a tactical genius and compiled his knowledge in a book of sayings titled “The Art of War.” There, now you are caught up.) The protagonist of “The Art of War,” also named Kelly Roman, is seeking to avenge his brother, who was killed in mysterious circumstances while working for a Chinese corporation.

It is not the setting itself is not that makes “The Art of War” unique, but the fictional events that lead up to the creation of that distopia. In the novel, China takes over the United States through economics, not military invasion. This has the result of devastating the country side and killing civilians through starvation and lack of medical care rather than bullets and bombs. Only major economic centers (such as New York) are spared the devastation due to their usefulness to the invading Chinese corporations. Through malicious investing through corporate proxies, the Chinese government is able to seize control of American food supplies, health care, military forces, and other key assets.

Additionally, as a result of the Chinese economic invasion of the United States, corporations remain the only functioning institutions in society. They conduct their own semi-religious services, bury their employees in private grave yards, and dole out marital discipline on employees and violent attacks on competitors without fear of legal repercussion.

Great science fiction presents either a utopian or distopian vision of the future; this is as equally true in comics as it is in film or prose. In tying a medieval Chinese warlord with a corporate CEO, the author is making a clear statement regarding the ruthless nature of corporations. In addition to criticizing corporations for being heartless entities being concerned with nothing else but profit, (Which has been done by other authors.) Roman makes a powerful statement about the future of war. In the author’s vision, the future of war will be at least partially economic. While there are political disagreements over the issue, the possibilities of Chinese economic or militarydomination sometime this century are certainly being discussed. In closing, what makes “The Art of War” most intriguing is the plausibility of its scenario.

“Pathfinder” Comic is OK, Except for Terrible Writing

“Pathfinder: Dark Waters” is an adaptation of the Pathfinder role-playing game (which is a form of Dungeons and Dragons). Typically, Dynamite does an excellent job adapting story lines from other media forms into really enjoyable comics. However, with “Pathfinder: Dark Waters” they fell short.

The title is not without merit. The art is quite good, and the pages are action packed. The second half of each issue provides everything needed to play the story from the first half as a D&D adventure; this includes dungeon maps and character sheets for each character featured in the story. While this format is an innovative way to present a role-playing setting, such an approach  does not lend itself to good writing.

For those of you unfamiliar with Dungeons and Dragons, the players typically follow a preset plot and interact with various characters in that plot. This typically does not lend itself to incredibly well polished story telling, but that is made up for in the game-play experience. “Pathfinder: Dark Waters” is written like the transcripts from a D&D game and leaves very little for non-role playing readers. The dialog consists of a cascading stream of exposition focusing on introducing characters or explaining the character’s actions. Such writing would not be a problem if the comics were exclusively marketed to D&D players or were given out free with merchandise. However, if Dynamite expects readers to continue to buy this comic, they must improve the quality of writing.

Bedlam Engages Horrible Crimes Artfully

Bedlam #1 introduces Madder Red as a deeply disturbed former villain seeking to atone for his crimes. Bedlam is published by Image Comics, and the first issue is available for free digital download (link found below).

The “anti-hero seeking redemption” motif is hardly new to comics. However, Bedlam explores many of the darker elements of human nature in a way to deeply engage the reader. Madder Red’s story line explores the mental health issues that droves him to commit his crimes, the criminal justice system that attempts to contain him, and society’s attempts to protect itself from him.

Given recent events, I would not suggest this publication for everyone. Bedlam #1 opens with the massacre of a class of young children on a field trip. This opening taps not only the terror of the recent school shootings in Connecticut, but also the massacres that etched themselves deeply into the psyches of those of us who came of age in the late 90s. This theme is not to be trifled with. Broaching such a deeply disturbing subject requires great artistic and story telling skill. However, if done well, engaging such issues via comics can go far in advancing the social dialog surrounding them.

It should be noted that Bedlam #1 was published well before the recent tragedy in Connecticut. It is a very sad fact that such events are a terrible possibility in our society. Bedlam does not turn away from the very real horrors of violent crime. Instead, the artists engage the issues to help us better understand the criminals and ourselves.